More Comments on ROG Tennis


ROG = Red, Orange, Green tennis balls.

If you read this blog you know I have been following the lively conversation about the USTA’s 10 and Under tennis mandate.   Here are some of the highlights from the many comments on the subject.

These are from tennis-prose.com and are responding to the original letter by Wayne Bryan

You’re Wrong Wayne · February 4, 2012 at 12:26 am.

First you are wrong about 10 and under tennis. 10 and under tennis is great and how would you know. Have you been to any of the Southern California designated tournaments for the 10′s? 10 and under tennis with green balls is great for many reasons. First it teaches the kids to hit through the ball. Second it allows the kids to be all court players and transition to the net and not worry about being lobbed every time they get up to the net. Third it creates longer rallies and makes kids have to develop points. Lastly the ball doesnt bounce super high so then kids dont have to hit every ball above their head. Are there kids who will transition away for 10 and under equipment. Yes but the cream of the crop will always rise to the top.

You are all about getting kids to have fun and enjoy the sport, which is great! So wouldn’t you want kids to have more success from the beginning?

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

From It’s a Racquet · January 18, 2012 at 12:44 am

I have just gone from being a critic of Mr. Bryan (apparantly for no good reason) to a huge fan and supporter after getting to know him better through his comments. I agree with much of what he said and feel someone with his passion, knowledge and experience should lead the USTA (now!).

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Isapak · February 18, 2012 at 3:51 pm

Mr. Bryan,
This is GREAT letter and insight on your behalf, infact voice for thousands of parents & coaches. My son who is 7 and is been coached by a wonderful, wise, experienced and talented ex-pro since 2 years, he has similar concept, like yours. Let the player develop their own style, have their own flair & create his own individualism.

Soon after we started to hear rumors about 10U rules, it was very disturbing that USTA wanted to RULE the way they think tennis should develop. Have they even seen players like my son and thousand of others who are much beyond the QS soft & colored balls? Have they given a choice to parents? Did they talk to grass root coaches about their opinion? Just because they are sitting on top of the pyramid, they think they know it all. Seems like it all comes down to USTA wants a part of a players success whether they developed them or not.

My son coach & i have decided to continue playing with yellow balls. We will support him playing as fas as he goes with his tennis. I wish there is solution to this at the earliest & also wish that efforts like yours do not go to vain.

Please keep pushing this and there are thousands & thousands of people to support you!

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

The Future of US Tennis · February 21, 2012 at 2:43 am

10 Years from Now we will all look back at this a see how narrow sited these old folks where. Lets look and see how great American Tennis will be in 2022. Wayne God bless you and your old ways, Dude Let it go. (lets go back to wooden rackets and long white pants. :)

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Player/Coach…20+ yrs · February 21, 2012 at 10:57 am

Wayne,
I’ve heard your are a great tennis enthusiast and you did remarkably well with your two boys! They are exceptional doubles players.
However… I dont believe you have your facts right regarding green dot tennis balls for u10s. I heard the Swedes were bit ahead of the world and started playing with softer balls already in the 60s…who dominated tennis in 80s?
Then I also know they moved away from softer balls cause it wasnt the in thing anymore…where are the Swedes these days??
Now I’m fulltime in this business and work with some great French coaches..and guess what..the French has been using softer balls for years as part of their programmes and they very seldom have less than 10 players top 100.
Just my 2cents worth of experience..
G
Ps..i dont give speaches or hold clinics. I only work closely with my own players and thanks to the Great American College system, I have more than 15 players all over the States on scholarships!

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

These are from Zoo Tennis and are responding to Patrick McEnroe’s response to the original letter by Wayne Bryan

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

This is one of the best spins I’ve ever read! The PR folk they had to write this response, should write for political campaigns. My last interview included some of that which Wayne Bryan pointed out (read it here: http://bit.ly/blm-interview – don’t be thrown by the writer’s chosen title, as the interview is far more encompassing).

Can all of us be wrong for such a large number of years that we’ve been saying these things, including now?

Morris King, Jr.
MAGIAN World Class Tennis
http://www.magian10S.com (official website)
facebook.com/morriskingjr (FB profile)
@magiantennis (Twitter)

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Patient for talent said…

TennisParent: All McEnroe does is run PD. Most of your items are USTA in general or NCAA. NCAA is it’s own machine and USTA and McEnroe have no sway over them.

As PD GM, McEnroe is not making decisions on L2 draw sizes. And toward that, honestly, if a player can’t make the top 120 or so (32×4) to gain L2 entry, that player hopefully loves and enjoys the game and will play some college tennis. But the idea that player is headed for a professional career and warrants the attention or services of McEnroe and PD is a long shot.

Also, on the 2014 proposal, I don’t believe your information is current. Hards are 128; Winters were converted to a gold ball team event (for now). But like the weather, just wait a few weeks because I’m sure it will keep changing.

You definitely have some good points about college tennis, but they should be targeted to the NCAA and the NCAA coaches that hold the cards.

I for one am willing to give McEnroe more time. He’s been at it 4 years and USTA has been more systematic about talent ID and it’s not all rankings driven as implied. Also, US has recently started having much better results at international junior events such as orange bowl, eddie herr, jr. Fed/Davis cup, jr grand slams.

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Igor said…

Pretty frustrating when your kid is on a wait list as an alternate for a national tournament, and a kid lower ranked and way down on the wait list gets to play over your junior because he is a PLAYER DEVELOPMENT player.

Hard work should be rewarded on merit.
No wonder we can never win an Open these days.
The cream never rises to the top with all these wild cards. Thanks Patrick..

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Florida Coach said…

Come on Patrick, there were also plenty of valid points in the comments of Mr. Bryan! I understand you want to defend your position, but this is not the way to go about it. Yes, I happen to know the USTA has done some great work with many juniors and pros in the past, however Mr. Bryan’s ideas come from working out in the country with juniors in the sections, just like many other coaches. I agree with him, that the USTA has recently taken some strange steps to improve the 10 and under devision. I totally disagree with the method of development that seems to be thought up by non-coaches that liked to re-invent the wheel. The new path Patrick and Mr Higueras have taken has that arrogant, “our way or the highway”, “one way to fit all” approach, that hurt the USTA so much in the past. And in speaking about the coaches that take less money than they could earn elsewhere, that does not apply at the moment with this economy Patrick. And you forgot to mention that so many good coaches left the USTA recently, dissatisfied about the approach and direction the development program has taken. I still believe the USTA can play a vital role in assisting players to reach their goals. But the board has to start waking up and realizing that hiring high profile, high payed, ex-players over and over again, is not the answer to helping and developing players. Being star struck on the top players of one country (As the spanish system seems to be the chosen developmental path) does not reflect the true effectiveness of the program. For example, Spain has not produced any young and upcoming players for some years now after Nadal. It also causes players and coaches in this country to feel inferior and to loose their own identity and game style that fits with the US Open. By the way, anyone that watches the current developments on the world scene will see the that the game has become faster all the time and that the slow clay court play style is becoming less dominant. On a different note, how are we going to make our juniors more tough when we have eliminated the third set in sectional events with a 10 point tie-break? How are we going to accomplish that with constantly decreasing the draw sizes, Sectionally and Nationally? The large draw sizes in the younger age groups was one of the reasons we were developing good juniors under 14!
There are so many of these things that need to be looked at, but with your 10 days a month commitment and with Jose not leaving his ranch/academy in Palm Springs, not much will change like that…..
Your arguments sound very passionate but don’t address the problems and we are no longer developing the amount of top juniors we once had.
You don’t have your ear to the ground on what is going on with junior tennis and have shown bad judgement in choosing your team and you and they operate. Time to move over….

–    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –

Tennisfanatic said…

So, what is Mr. McEnroe’s salary anyway?
It is a not for profit company, is his salary now a secret too?

Bob said…

Patrick McEnroe’s 2010 USTA Player Development salary was $809,480. He received $237,581 of other compensation from related organizations, I assume the USTA for Davis Cup.

Other 2010 USTA PD salaries + related income:

Jose Higueras $386,629 + 83,155
Tom Jacobs $272,737 + 108,720
Martin Blackman $273,028 + 90,687
Ola Malmquist $185,757 + 70,529
Ricardo Acuna $145,818 +43,390
Michael Sell $134,760 + 17,250
Jay Berger $189,415 + 62,509

Including those listed above, USTA Player Development employed 22 people with reported compensation above $100,000 in 2010.

The source for the above information is the 2010 Form 990 filed with the IRS by USTA Player Development Incorporated.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: