Category Archives: Tennis

Video – Rafa, Delpo and


Tennis, Shopping and Fitness?


ShopRite (United States)

ShopRite (United States) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Macaroni and Cheese can be made with whole milk, a stick of butter, enriched semolina elbows, and a plethora of full-fat cheeses.

Or it can be lightened with whole wheat pasta, skim milk, and low-fat cheeses.
It’s the second recipe that kids learned last month at the ShopRite in White Plains, as part of a new afterschool program run by the Jerry Alleyne Memorial Foundation that combines 10 and Under Tennis instruction with hands-on lessons in nutrition and healthy cooking.
The program, called “Cooking Matters for Kids,” is being offered once a week by ShopRite nutritionists, and is part of an array of programs offered by JAMF to help kids develop the skills they need to succeed both on the court and throughout their lives.
“They need to be healthy to play tennis and perform well in class,” said JAMF Director and Founder Loretta Van Raalte. “The earlier they learn the importance of a well-balanced diet and the benefits of tennis, the better off they will be.”
The nutrition sessions started about three weeks ago, and have focused on the basics of a healthy diet: from reducing sugar and fat to eating whole grains.
But the kids in the JAMF don’t only benefit from cooking classes. They also learn from playing tennis.
On Sunday mornings, JAMF offers an academy at New Rochelle Racquet Club, where kids get to learn and improve their skills. The players also compete in USTA Jr. Team Tennis, and last year took home the National title in the 18 and Under Intermediate division.

This is excerpted from the USTA/Eastern website – Learn more

HERE

Ivan Lendl Interview


Why not interview the man.  Ivan Lendl International Junior Tennis Academy used it’s blog to interview Lendl.  Good interview.  Here are some excerpts:

What bring you the most joy in the process of working with these kids?

“I really enjoyed to see the kids and how much they improve. When they are working on something, and I could give a bunch of examples…when they are working on something and then I see them a month or two months later and they have improved also having results, having good results; going to tournaments and winning some trophies and beating players they were not beating before they came to our academy. That’s what I really like.”

What is the biggest challenge in working with Andy for you and/or Andy?

“I can not speak for Andy so I am not going to. For me, the travel. I don’t like the travel. I have traveled so much in my life that whenever I have to go somewhere, it’s the worst part of what we do together. The best parts are when we are on the court and we are preparing and practicing. I like the practice weeks a lot more than the tournament weeks because it’s more fun. You get to interact more and also you see how much better he can get or how much he is getting.”

Read the whole interview – HERE

Summer Camp


Summer is coming and so is summer camp season.  Lots of kids go to summer camp programs at tennis clubs, country clubs as well as town and park programs.  Some kids go to overnight tennis camps for a week or two such as the Nike Tennis Camp at nearby Williams College.  Still others go to overnight camps for the summer or for one month.  Between the Adirondacks, the Catskills, the Berkshires and the Helderbergs we have a lot of overnight camps within a few hours drive.  Many of them have good tennis programs and lots of fun activities for their campers – from Baseball and Basketball to Rock Climbing; from Swimming and Boating to Dance and Arts & Crafts – the kids have loads of fun at these camps.

I recently toured one such camp – Camp Eagle Hill in Elizaville, New York.  From my door it took me one hour and ten minutes to get to Eagle Hill so it is fairly close by.  Eagle Hill is a family run, coed, 200 acre facility which features a lake, 2 swimming pools along with 8 tennis courts.  There are all types of sporting activities and activities for the mind and soul.  I will be working with Eagle Hill providing referrals from the Capital District area so if you want more information, feel free to contact me.

Through the years I have worked with a lot of kids who have attended various overnight camps.  Their experiences have always been positive.  I have also had hundreds of camp kids at my tournaments and have done intercamps with several overnight camps.  The kids all love it at camp and have a great time.  Not all of the overnight camps have the same commitment to tennis but there are a lot of camps with good tennis programs in our region.  If you are looking for a great experience for your child this summer, look into one of the great overnight camps in our region.

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Tennis has Changed in the Last 30 years


by Paul McElhinney – “Steve G Tennis” Blog

Here are a few excerpts – Read the whole post – HERE

Much less in the game is now left up to chance and fate. Hawkeye technology has improved the quality of line calls. We see fewer histrionics directed at court officials, as players can now appeal to the unequivocal justice of line technology. Umpires are no longer referred to as ‘the pits of the world’ – players now have recourse to a line of authority without our human failings .

In line with greater understanding of the physiological and technical aspects of the game, has been the wider appreciation of the mental aspects. Where so little in terms of technical and physical ability divides players at the top of the game, the focus for competitive advantage is more on mental strength – again, a trend evident across the sporting world. Given the rise of professionalism in the game, any advantages to be gleaned from psychological, attitudinal or spiritual factors are keenly focused on. More is also known now about proper diet, hydration and rest and recovery periods, highlighting the changes over the 30 years.

The rise of the media has also created a more ‘media savvy’ player, more adept at dealing with the media than in earlier eras. Press conferences can often be a minefield for the top players who require good media skills to cope. Public image is increasingly seen as crucial and with the ubiquity of the media now, players must know how to cope with it effectively. TV, You-Tube, Twitter and Facebook now dominate, whereas for most of the 1980’s public, it was limited to BBC1 and 2, a few newspaper tennis columns and a limited number of tennis magazines.

For all these changes, much about the game remains the same. Sets (non-tie break ones) still involve the winner winning six games, umpires still rule the roost from their high chairs and Wimbledon still serves strawberries and cream. Part of the strength of the game is its being able to balance tradition with evolving developments – a game secure in its past and confident about its future.

How Tennis Has Changed Over The Last 30 Years


by Paul McElhinney – “Steve G Tennis” Blog

Here are a few excerpts – Read the whole post – HERE

Much less in the game is now left up to chance and fate. Hawkeye technology has improved the quality of line calls. We see fewer histrionics directed at court officials, as players can now appeal to the unequivocal justice of line technology. Umpires are no longer referred to as ‘the pits of the world’ – players now have recourse to a line of authority without our human failings .

In line with greater understanding of the physiological and technical aspects of the game, has been the wider appreciation of the mental aspects. Where so little in terms of technical and physical ability divides players at the top of the game, the focus for competitive advantage is more on mental strength – again, a trend evident across the sporting world. Given the rise of professionalism in the game, any advantages to be gleaned from psychological, attitudinal or spiritual factors are keenly focused on. More is also known now about proper diet, hydration and rest and recovery periods, highlighting the changes over the 30 years.

The rise of the media has also created a more ‘media savvy’ player, more adept at dealing with the media than in earlier eras. Press conferences can often be a minefield for the top players who require good media skills to cope. Public image is increasingly seen as crucial and with the ubiquity of the media now, players must know how to cope with it effectively. TV, You-Tube, Twitter and Facebook now dominate, whereas for most of the 1980’s public, it was limited to BBC1 and 2, a few newspaper tennis columns and a limited number of tennis magazines.

For all these changes, much about the game remains the same. Sets (non-tie break ones) still involve the winner winning six games, umpires still rule the roost from their high chairs and Wimbledon still serves strawberries and cream. Part of the strength of the game is its being able to balance tradition with evolving developments – a game secure in its past and confident about its future.

What Does the “Hot Hand” Mean in Tennis?


Good article from the archive’s at “Heavy Topspin”:

In sports analytics, the topic of streakiness–the “hot hand“–is a popular one. Nearly everyone believes it exists, that players (or even teams) can go on a hot or cold streak, during which they temporarily play above or below their true level.

To a certain extent, streakiness is inevitable–if you flip a coin 100 times, you’ll see segments of 5 or 10 flips in which most of the flips are heads. That’s not because the coin suddenly got “better,” it’s a natural occurence over a long enough time span. So if you watch an entire tennis match, there are bound to be games where one player seems to be performing better than usual, perhaps stringing together several aces or exceptional winners.

The question, then, is whether a player is more streaky than would occur purely at random. To take just one example, let’s say a player hits aces on 10% of service points. If he did occasionally serve better than usual, we would observe that after he hits one ace, he is more likely (say, 15% or 20%) to hit another ace. A missed first or second serve might make it more likely than he misses his next try.

My last couple of topics–differences in the deuce/ad court, and the “reverse hot hand” at 30-40–have hinted that tennis may be structured in a way that prevents players from getting hot.

Read More – HERE

Ted Murray Interview on Tennis Authority


Ted MurrayBlog Talk radio andthe UR10s Network featured a podcast interview with Tedd Murray on the “”Tennis Authority” Show:

Here is a link to listen to or download the interview:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ur10snetwork/2013/02/15/the-tennis-authority

Ted Murray

Is founder of “Tennis from the Heart” – Developing Character Through Sports

Vision

Our vision is to make tennis fun and fulfilling while developing life skills that will contribute to achieving ones’ dreams.

MISSION

My goal is to create a community of players, parents, and coaches who share a similar philosophy of making tennis an enjoyable, personal development process that contributes immense value to everyone involved in the sport. By sharing the philosophy, tools, and training that really works and has life-altering potential, Tennis From the Heart can contribute to the adoption of a new paradigm towards competition, the opponent, and sports in general. The goal will be self-improvement and growth with the score being an important incentive and measuring device for one’s progress.

The entire program provides training for coaches and parents as well as players in a variety of formats: online instruction, books and videos, and live workshops anywhere in the world. By consulting with tennis clubs and resorts worldwide we can establish a positive atmosphere that will lead to increased profitability for the club by creating more enjoyment and value for everyone. The wonderful sport of tennis can help you lead a life you love and can help the entire world gain more understanding and cooperation.

http://tennisfromtheheart.com/


Over 37 years of tennis coaching in a variety of locations throughout the world and working with players of all levels and abilities, including multiple Grand Slam winners and Olympic medalists such as Leander Paes.

My goal is to share my unique concepts of tennis teaching to as many players and coaches as possible in order to enable players throughout the world to develop a greater passion for the game while improving their skills. Help students and coaches tap into the emotional and spiritual development that is possible to achieve through tennis. Provide consulting services to tennis programs worldwide to improve the entire delivery system of tennis and make it more fun and accessible to people worldwide.

Specialties: Training tennis coaches, Cardio Tennis programs, starting new tennis programs, developing top junior talent, Starting club and tennis combinations, writing inspirational tennis articles and books. Consulting for the tennis business.
As a USPTA Pro 1 and president of his own tennis management company, Ted Murray lends a wealth of knowledge and experience to the many aspects of the tennis profession.


In 1973, Ted met Peter Burwash, who taught and inspired Ted to make tennis a career.

Ted spent the next 20 years with Peter Burwash International and is a founding member of the world-renowned tennis management company. While at PBI, Ted directed tennis in such places as Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Mexico City and Canada.

Previously, he directed tennis for the Hotel Camino Real and Costa Rica Country Club, where he was responsible for the elite junior program at 16 courts.

Now, with his own company, Ted is currently developing the Punta Gorda Club for Tennis and Fitness in Punta Gorda, Fla. The club features seven tennis courts and a 15,000-square-foot fitness center. He also co-authored a book titled “Tennis Unlimited.”

Ted’s international experience also extends to the junior development arena. He developed future Davis Cup players for India while working for the Britannia-Amritraj Tennis Foundation in Madras, India. While there, Ted helped coach the 1996 Olympic Bronze Medalist, Leander Paes.

Other junior teams he helped coach include the Hawaii Junior Davis Cup Team, as well as nationally ranked juniors in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Atlanta.

Unbeaten Since 2003, Wheelchair Champ Retires


Esther vergeerAnother Good article from Ben Rothenberg of the New York Times:

Esther Vergeer … , a Dutch wheelchair tennis juggernaut, announced her retirement at 31 on Tuesday in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

She retires with an active win streak in singles of 470 matches, her last loss coming a little more than 10 years ago, in January 2003. Vergeer lost only 18 sets during the streak, and she won more than a third of her sets by the score of 6-0. She had 95 6-0, 6-0 victories in her career.

“I’m hugely proud of my performances, my titles and can look back on my career with a great feeling,” Vergeer said. “Keeping going would not add anything.”

Vergeer spent 668 weeks at No. 1, including every week from Oct. 2, 2000, to Jan. 21, 2013.

She continued to push to improve even after years of uninterrupted supremacy. In 2009, she began working with the Dutch coach Sven Groeneveld, who coached Monica Seles, Mary Pierce and Ana Ivanovic.

“To work with someone who has been that long undefeated took a little time to adapt,” Groeneveld said. “Because what do you work on? What can be better if you’re undefeated for so long?”

Read More – HERE

Local Pro and Catholic Central Girls High School coach Russ Hessleton says of Vergeer “

 I remember when she first came to the US and played the Florida circuit.
She has always been an outstanding tennis player. She understood that if you want to play at the highest level you have to work at the highest level.
She understood this even when other wheelchair players, both men and women, did not.
The wheelchair tennis community will long await another athlete that will be able to come close to her accomplishments, in fact the tennis community in general will likely never have anyone come close to what she has accomplished. “
Russ, himself, is a very accomplished Wheelchair Athlete.  Former President of the United Spjnal Asociation

Steroid Shots for Tennis Elbow Miss the Mark: Study


tennis-elbow-pictureFrom the “Health” Magazine website:

February 5, 2013    By Steven Reinberg     HealthDay Reporter

Here are a few excerpts:

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) — A corticosteroid shot is a common treatment for “tennis elbow,” but a new study finds it might do more harm than good.

“Patients having steroid injections should be warned of the potential for recurrence three to 12 months after the injection, even after feeling any benefit in the short term,” said senior study author Bill Vicenzino, chairman of sports physiotherapy at the University of Queensland in St. Lucia, Australia.

Recurrences are usually put down to the fact that patients feel better after the injection and then do too much too soon, Vicenzino said.

“However, the steroid injection produced higher recurrence rates than did a placebo injection, indicating that the actual steroid medication is likely the reason for the high recurrence rates,”

After a year, the investigators found that 83 percent of those who had a steroid injection had a complete recovery or were much improved, compared with 96 percent of those who had the placebo injection.

There is a lot more to the article.  You can read the whole thing – HERE


From “Home Remedies For You”

Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is a condition in which the outer elbow region becomes tender and sore. It is a common cause of elbow pain, especially in the case of individuals who play racquet sports like tennis or squash. However, this injury can afflict anyone because of an overuse of that particular part of the elbow. This condition generally occurs when the tendons connected to the outer part of the elbow get inflamed. These tendons help in moving the wrists backwards.

For more description including Symptoms of Tennis Elbow; Causes of Tennis Elbow; Remedies for Tennis Elbow; Diet for Tennis Elbow; Suggestions for Tennis Elbow and Tennis Elbow: Frequently asked questions – CLICK HERE 

Arthur Ashe


Ashe

“The ideal attitude is to be physically losse and mental tight ” Arthur Ashe

Arthur Ashe died 30 years ago today.  Many people only know of him because of Arthur Ashe Kids Day or the Arthur Ashe statue at the National Tennis Center.  This web site gives us the facts about his life and what he stood for.  Although he became #1 in the world in tennis, there was always more to Arthur Ashe than winning tennis tournaments (which he did 34 times in his career).  There was so much more to Ashe than his tennis that Sports Illustrated named him Sportsman of the Year 13 years after he retired from tennis.  Arthur will be forever connected to our area.  He spearheaded the founding of 15-LOVE.  Click on the link below to find out more about this great ambassador for our sport and explore the sites many pages.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/6r31Im/:snVlem5Y:LcIRMfb_/www.cmgww.com/sports/ashe/about/facts.htm/

CLICK HERE to find out more about 15-LOVE

A few more Quotes from Arthur Ashe:

“Drummed into me, above all, by my dad, by the whole family, was that without your good name, you would be nothing.”

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.”

Tim Hecker – RIP


uspta-logoFROM Tennis Served Fresh

Tim Heckler, former CEO of the USPTA, passed away on Monday after suffering a heart attack. He was 71 years old.

“We are shocked and saddened by this loss,” said Tom Daglis, USPTA President. “He will be sorely missed in the industry as the single largest contributor to the USPTA in its entire history. Our deepest condolences go out to his wife, Renee, his children, and the rest of his family. They are all in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.”

Heckler retired from his position as chief executive officer of the USPTA in December 2012, after 30 years in the position. When Heckler was tapped as USPTA CEO in 1982, the organization had approximately 2,400 members and an annual budget of $700,000. He grew the association to the world’s oldest and largest organization of its kind, serving more than 15,000 members in 66 countries, and operating on an annual budget of $6.5 million.


Tim HecklerFrom USPTA web site (and Tennis Now):

HOUSTON – Tim Heckler, former chief executive officer of the United States Professional Tennis Association, passed away this morning in Houston after suffering a heart attack. He was 71 years old.

“We are shocked and saddened by this loss,” said Tom Daglis, USPTA President. “He will be sorely missed in the industry as the single largest contributor to the USPTA in its entire history. Our deepest condolences go out to his wife, Renee, his children, and the rest of his family. They are all in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.”

Heckler retired from his position as chief executive officer of the USPTA in December 2012, after 30 years in the position. When Heckler was tapped as USPTA CEO in 1982, the organization had approximately 2,400 members and an annual budget of $700,000. He grew the association to the world’s oldest and largest organization of its kind, serving more than 15,000 members in 66 countries, and operating on an annual budget of $6.5 million.

Heckler, who began playing tennis at age 3, started his tennis-teaching career in 1970, the same year he joined USPTA. He was elected president of the USPTA Texas Division in 1974 and served as national president of the organization from 1980 to 1982. With Heckler’s guidance, USPTA became one of the first tennis organizations to embrace technology, first through the computerization of the business itself as early as 1982, and then later through its use of the Internet and email-based communications and education.

USPTA introduced its first website in 1995. The USPTA honored Heckler in 2000 by naming him a grand inductee in the Association’s Hall of Fame. He also received the International Tennis Hall of Fame’s Tennis Educational Merit Award in 2002 and was inducted into the Texas Tennis Hall of Fame in 2005.

In 2008 he received the highest honor awarded by the United States Professional Tennis Association, the George Bacso Lifetime Achievement Award. He attended Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, on a tennis scholarship and played on the international circuit, including Wimbledon in 1959 and 1961, and the U.S. Open in 1960.

Arrangements are pending. Please check back to USPTA.com for more details.


From Twitter (as of 10:10 PM Eastern Time – Monday, February 4, 2013)

Our deepest condolences go out to the Heckler family. Tim passed earlier today of a heart attack. He was 71. He will be remembered #USPTA

Joe is President of USPTA Eastern and Head Tennis Pro at the Trump National Golf Club in Westchester, NY


The iTPA is very sad to hear about the passing of Tim Heckler (former USPTA CEO). He changed the tennis industry. #RIP @USPTA_Tennis

International Tennis Performance Association is the worldwide tennis specific education & certification organization for trainers, coaches and specialists.


Our condolences to the family of former USPTA CEO & President Tim Heckler, who passed away today. http://bit.ly/WMSIvn  pic.twitter.com/JodNWGkJ


A tragic loss, we wish Tim’s family the best RT @USPTA_Tennis USPTA mourns the death of former CEO Tim Hecklerhttp://bit.ly/VFzFIm


Shocked to hear the news that Tim Heckler (former @USPTA_Tennis CEO) has passed. Condolences to his family #RIP #Legacy http://www.uspta.com/default.aspx?act=newsletter.aspx&newsletterid=871 …

Mark Kovacs is Manager of Sports Science for the USTA and Head of Sports Science for the PTR.  he is also a founder of ITPA (above).


Tom Perrotta@TomPerrotta

Told that Tim Heckler, long-time USPTA (teaching pros) CEO who finished his run in 2012, has died of a heart attack. A wonderful man. RIP.

A Brooklyn Tennis writer


From Facebook (as of 10:10 PM Eastern Time – Monday, February 4, 2013)

A sad day for the USPTA family. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Hecklers.
USPTA mourns the death of former CEO Tim Heckler
uspta.com
Tim Heckler, former chief executive officer of the United States Professional Tennis Association, passed away this morning in Houston after suffering a heart attack. He was 71 years old. “We are shocked and saddened by this loss,” said Tom Daglis, USPTA President. “He will be sorely missed in…

USTA Northern · 942 like this
USTA Northern would like to pass along its condolences to the friends and family of Tim Heckler, former chief executive officer of the United States Professional Tennis Association, who passed away this morning in Houston after suffering a heart attack. Tim was a trailblazer for the tennis industry and had just retired in December. His impact will be forever felt within the industry. He will be greatly missed.

Adaptive Tennis / Ballboy


I think the best understanding of adaptive tennis comes from reading the mission statement of the Addaptive Tennis Association of North Carolina:

The mission of the ATANC (Adaptive Tennis Association of North Carolina) is to strive to provide a positive tennis experience, enhancing the mental, physical, emotional, and social well being of individuals with intellectual disabilities through their learning the skills required to participate  and compete in the sport of tennis.

But it goes beyond that.  The USTA/Adaptive Tennis Homeoage states:

Tennis is for ANYONE and EVERYONE

The game of tennis can be adapted to accommodate any age, environment, condition, or disability. The charge of USTA Adaptive Tennis is to promote and develop recreational tennis opportunities for individuals with varying abilities and circumstances through inclusion, knowledge, and support. The USTA continues to support programming for individuals with physical, developmental, and situational challenges.

I remember seeing this ballboy at the U.S. Open.  As Paul Harvey would say “Now you know the rest of the story.”

Wounded Vet Snags Balls and Limelight at US Open

Ryan McIntoshArmy veteran Ryan McIntosh inspires others as a ballperson at the US Open.
Ballpersons at the US Open are at their best if they are neither seen nor heard while doing their job. But at the 2012 Open, we heard a lot about a ballperson named Ryan McIntosh.
He’s a 23-year-old from San Antonio, Texas, an Army veteran who lost a leg when he stepped on a land mine in Afghanistan. This year while participating at the Wounded Warrior Games in Colorado, Ryan learned of the USTA’s Military Outreach program and the ballpersons’ tryouts. Wearing either a prosthesis in a Nike running shoe or the bended metal leg with a thick rubber sole often seen now at amputee track meets, he was able to do everything required of a ballperson, and was one of the 250 out of more than 500 hopefuls selected to participate.
While Ryan had always played a variety of sports before his injury, tennis wasn’t one of them. In addition to the running, scooping, throwing, squatting and standing in extreme weather conditions a ballperson must be able to do, he also had to learn the sport, things like how tiebreakers work.
Ryan obviously learned quickly and well, as he joined 25-year-old Denise Castelli, another right leg amputee, from New Jersey, who was working her second US Open. Both were utilized at many matches, including Ryan at the Djokovic/Ferrer semi-final and Castelli at the women’s final.
At the pinnacle of tennis, the US Open, the seemingly disabled proved to be more than able — and grateful for the opportunity to show the world so.
Usually if we talk about adaptive tennis, we are talking about people playing tennis.  Here is a clip from You Tube:

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Comment from You Tube:

alloneword154 2 years ago

I’am an able bodied person who has played tennis for 14 years now, and I’am so glad to see this video. I know the joy tennis has brought me and to see these kids enjoy it too is truly heart warming.

Tennis Travel on the Blogs


jupiter_res_lgDonald Trump’s takeover of the exclusive Ritz-Carlton Golf Club and Spa, now known as Trump National Golf Club, Jupiter, will lead to an improved tennis facility, promises Trump Jupiter Director of Spa and Recreation Kimberly Van Keuven. “Donald Trump understands how important tennis is to this Club,” she told www.tennisresortsonline.com in January.

Immediate efforts will include the resurfacing of the Club’s two Har-Tru courts, new windscreens and a new head pro. David Nowak, a Boca Raton resident and former head pro at the Delray Beach Tennis Center and director of tennis at The Club at Admiral’s Cove in Jupiter, replaces Dick Stockton, who had been at the Ritz for about four years. Stockton, a world-class touring pro through the Seventies and into the Eighties whose ranking had reached as high as 7 during his career, is developing several Tennis Legends-related projects from his home and office in Wellington, Florida.

Learn More – CLICK HERE


Four SeasonsThe AAA Five Diamond Four Seasons Resort Nevis boasts a 10-court Tennis Centre with four red clay courts and six hard courts. It is consistently ranked by Tennis Resorts Online as one of the top tennis programs in the world (#8) and the #1 in the Caribbean and tops on the list of Four Seasons properties. Tennis Now also ranked the Resort as one of the top five international tennis properties, while resident PBI Pro Chris Myrold was runner up as PBI’s Tennis PRO of the year.

The Resort offers year-round social mixers and clinics for adults, juniors and “Pee Wees” under the expert instruction of PBI professionals. The popular Love Match experience brings couples together on the court for some active bonding. The Resort is known for its guaranteed match play where Nevisian and Four Seasonsexpatriate staff join guests for matches.

CLICK HERE – for full article


For “The Guardian” in the UK

Want to spend your next holiday brushing up on your backhand? For those armchair players inspired by Wimbledon, Liat Joshi profiles eight of the top tennis holidays from around Europe and the UK

Here is a sample

Tennis holidays

Break point

Want to spend your next holiday brushing up on your backhand? For those armchair players inspired by Wimbledon, Liat Joshi profiles eight of the top tennis holidays from around Europe and the UK

Perfecting the serve … La Manga resort in Spain has a staggering 28 courts.

It’s as predictable as most of the Brits losing in the first round: every year the nation goes tennis-mad during Wimbledon fortnight and then promptly forgets all about serves, slices and court-side strawberries and cream for another 50 weeks. But what if your interest in tennis continues after the last thud of ball against racket in next Sunday’s final? What if you are so enthused that you want to pack your racket and head off for some intensive coaching on a tennis holiday?

Until recently, short-haul options were rather limited and those in the know headed to the US – Florida alone has more rackets resorts than the whole of Europe.

However, European hoteliers are finally realising tennis fans need more places to play away from home and the last 18 months have seen the establishment of new academies at Tenerife’s Abama Resort and Aphrodite Hills in Cyprus.

The hotel industry might be turning to tennis but the same can’t be said for most tour operators and travel agents. Golf and ski brochures abound yet information on hotels with serious racket facilities is as elusive as Centre Court tickets at SW19.

So here is a list of the best places to go in the UK and the rest of Europe to make your game a little more hit than miss. Some are for serious racket buffs wanting to bash balls for hours; others have ample off-court attractions if you aren’t willing or able to play tennis all day. None are cheap per se, as coaching fees come on top of accommodation costs. But there are good-value options, as well as breaks for those who love their luxury as much as their tennis.

In the UK

Jonathan Markson, Oxford Tennis Camp
Every Summer, Markson and his coaches take over 30 of Oxford University’s grass and hard courts, some of them overlooked by the city’s famous dreaming spires. Most camp participants favour the impeccable grass courts – a rare treat, as few clubs or parks still offer this high-maintenance surface.

A hefty 30 hours of tennis is scheduled over six days, including tuition, competitive play and video analysis of your strengths and weaknesses.

The Oxford camps are highly sociable: activities range from barbecues to punting. Participants stay in student rooms – basic but convenient for the tennis courts – and all meals are provided so you should have enough fuel to get through the full-on schedule.

· £690pp per week full-board, including accommodation and coaching. 0207 603 2422, marksontennis.com.

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