Tag Archives: Tennis

Tennis has Changed in the Last 30 years


by Paul McElhinney – “Steve G Tennis” Blog

Here are a few excerpts – Read the whole post – HERE

Much less in the game is now left up to chance and fate. Hawkeye technology has improved the quality of line calls. We see fewer histrionics directed at court officials, as players can now appeal to the unequivocal justice of line technology. Umpires are no longer referred to as ‘the pits of the world’ – players now have recourse to a line of authority without our human failings .

In line with greater understanding of the physiological and technical aspects of the game, has been the wider appreciation of the mental aspects. Where so little in terms of technical and physical ability divides players at the top of the game, the focus for competitive advantage is more on mental strength – again, a trend evident across the sporting world. Given the rise of professionalism in the game, any advantages to be gleaned from psychological, attitudinal or spiritual factors are keenly focused on. More is also known now about proper diet, hydration and rest and recovery periods, highlighting the changes over the 30 years.

The rise of the media has also created a more ‘media savvy’ player, more adept at dealing with the media than in earlier eras. Press conferences can often be a minefield for the top players who require good media skills to cope. Public image is increasingly seen as crucial and with the ubiquity of the media now, players must know how to cope with it effectively. TV, You-Tube, Twitter and Facebook now dominate, whereas for most of the 1980’s public, it was limited to BBC1 and 2, a few newspaper tennis columns and a limited number of tennis magazines.

For all these changes, much about the game remains the same. Sets (non-tie break ones) still involve the winner winning six games, umpires still rule the roost from their high chairs and Wimbledon still serves strawberries and cream. Part of the strength of the game is its being able to balance tradition with evolving developments – a game secure in its past and confident about its future.

How Tennis Has Changed Over The Last 30 Years


by Paul McElhinney – “Steve G Tennis” Blog

Here are a few excerpts – Read the whole post – HERE

Much less in the game is now left up to chance and fate. Hawkeye technology has improved the quality of line calls. We see fewer histrionics directed at court officials, as players can now appeal to the unequivocal justice of line technology. Umpires are no longer referred to as ‘the pits of the world’ – players now have recourse to a line of authority without our human failings .

In line with greater understanding of the physiological and technical aspects of the game, has been the wider appreciation of the mental aspects. Where so little in terms of technical and physical ability divides players at the top of the game, the focus for competitive advantage is more on mental strength – again, a trend evident across the sporting world. Given the rise of professionalism in the game, any advantages to be gleaned from psychological, attitudinal or spiritual factors are keenly focused on. More is also known now about proper diet, hydration and rest and recovery periods, highlighting the changes over the 30 years.

The rise of the media has also created a more ‘media savvy’ player, more adept at dealing with the media than in earlier eras. Press conferences can often be a minefield for the top players who require good media skills to cope. Public image is increasingly seen as crucial and with the ubiquity of the media now, players must know how to cope with it effectively. TV, You-Tube, Twitter and Facebook now dominate, whereas for most of the 1980’s public, it was limited to BBC1 and 2, a few newspaper tennis columns and a limited number of tennis magazines.

For all these changes, much about the game remains the same. Sets (non-tie break ones) still involve the winner winning six games, umpires still rule the roost from their high chairs and Wimbledon still serves strawberries and cream. Part of the strength of the game is its being able to balance tradition with evolving developments – a game secure in its past and confident about its future.

Preventing and Treating Blisters


From the USTA’s “Player to Player” Column:

From Ken, Highland Park, IL:

Usually having your hands toughen up from playing is a good thing. When you haven’t played for sometime that is when a blister usually happens. Putting the hand in hot water and washing it a lot helps. You might want to look at his grip size and also might want to try some over grip. Another thing could be the way he is holding the racket.

From Mary, Osprey, FL:

I am Mary, now of Osprey, Florida and I am speaking of experience with my son from the time he was a junior player thru college. He is 51 now and still plays competitive tennis and loves it still so all may not be lost.

My son probably was not as bad as you describe your son but he had the bumps under the skin and pain. He tried the tennis glove, pads and various ways to try to relieve the problem. He did finally get the way he gripped the racket changed and helped. My son had the heel or very end of the racket held so that it laid right in that fatty part of the heel of the hand. He moved the racket so the end of it did not press into that part of his hand so much. Eventually he had (during tennis career in college) he had to have carpel tunnel surgery as his right arm from the hand up started swelling and the pain was excruciating to his elbow. The carpel tunnel surgery left a scar and tenderness such that he had to adjust the racket differently again and took a little time but eventually was ok. I am not sure if this helps much but maybe helps to know it does happen and I will say good luck and hope he can find a solution so as not to have to do the carpel tunnel surgery but I am assuming it is where that nerve can be affected too.

From Rick, Lugoff, SC:

The Bionic Glove for tennis would be a good addition to his “wardrobe”.

From Tom (PTR Instructor), Manchester, NH:

Dear Karen, it shouldn’t go with the territory. I would definitely try the Wilson Pro Overgrips. Best buy is 12 pack.

Also to help get rid of the callous and to prevent it, get some lotion that has stearic acid in it…usually it is in the cheaper brands. Dollar store stuff; ‘ ‘Perfect Purity’ brand Advanced Lubricating skin lotion.

Why is it happening…sounds like he is holding the butt cap or bottom of the grip a little high in his hand. He could try and choke up just a little (1/2″?) so the butt cab is on the heel pad or better yet find a certified tennis pro (PTR/USPTA) and ask him to check his grip and bio-mechanics of his strokes to find the root cause and how to fix it. Should be just a one time lesson for even a half hour to find the problem….more to fix it if you can’t get it on your own. Good luck…

From Don, Livonia, MI:

Try some Teflon tape on his hand. You can find it at a bowling center or pro shop. Bowlers use it for callous & blisters on there thumbs & fingers.

From Peter, Westport, CT:

My name is Peter and I am a certified teaching pro in Westport, CT.  I suggest using a nail file to shave the callous down.  It gets rid of the excess tough skin and is painless.  As for the grip I suggest tourna grips for him to use.

*Please note that any advice given out in this forum should in no way be confused with actual medical advice. Before starting any new exercise regimen or altering your existing one, we strongly urge you to consult with your regular physician.

Here’s a few from USTA’s LinkIn page:

Aldrin Deloria • Definitely use overgrips, and change them every 2-4 hitting sessions YMMV. If you use overgrips beyond their useful life, it increases potential for blisters. I recommend asking your local tennis shop/tennis coach what they recommend. Perhaps also re-evaluate the tennis grip size/stroke fundamentals with a good coach.

Some people just have sensitive hands, so they may need a thin bandage in that area, or possibly a “tennis glove”.

Gary Caron • I had one student who suffered from blisters and we found that using rubbing alcohol worked to harden or dry out the area where it blistered so he would use nightly and then did not have any issues. He was a National Level Player and trained 2 -4 hours daily so it was becoming an issue until we tried that. Also agree with the comment about monitoring and changing overgrips as needed,.

and here is a thrad from the Tennis Warehouse Blog:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=119354

Shopping at the Bookstore for your Tennis Player


Holiday gifts that for that special tennis player that you’ll find in the bookstore (Released in the past year or so):


Andy Murray ChampionAndy Murray: Champion -The Full Extraordinary Story (Paperback) – by Mark Hodgkinson

SimonandSchuster (http://books.simonandschuster.co.uk/Andy-Murray-Champion/To-Be-Announced/9781471126529) –

When Andy Murray finally overcame Novak Djokovic in a five-set thriller to secure the 2012 US Open, it was a dream fulfilled for the man from Dunblane. After four previous defeats in Grand Slam finals, Murray had finally achieved what no British man had managed since the 1930s. But the story of how he got there was just as compelling as the final itself, with as many twists and turns along the way. Writer Mark Hodgkinson has been covering that story since the start – he was actually the first person to interview Murray for a national newspaper back in 2004, and has worked closely with Judy Murray in the past.
In Andy Murray: Champion, Hodgkinson explains how Murray first emerged as a tennis player of true quality, and how his rivalry with his brother Jamie spurred him on. He looks at the close relationship Murray has with his mother, and the various coaches who haved worked with him to assess their influence on his game. In a hugely competitive era of tennis, with Federer, Nadal and Djokovic all counted to be among the greatest tennis players of all time, Murray has earned the right to be ranked alongside them all – and this book explains how and why he has done so, becoming a true national sporting icon in the process.


Love MatchLove Match – by Ali Vali

Parker “Kong” King is the number one tennis player in the world with a real talent for getting women in her bed. To prepare herself for the one title she’s never won—and avoid the press and her ex—she retreats to a secluded home in Press Cove, Alabama. There she’ll also be safe from the Soldiers of God who’ve threatened to kill her for what they see as her depraved lifestyle.

Commercial pilot Caption Sydney Parish loves the order that comes from a well-constructed plan for everything, her only failure being her personal life. She hopes a vacation will help heal her bruised heart, but soon finds that might not be possible when she discovers she’s one house over from Parker King.

When Parker and Sydney meet, sparks fly, but not from attraction. They have the summer to see if they have a love match, or will the Soldiers of God kill their chance for a relationship?


TENNIS CALENDARS – 2013

Tennis Wall Calendar 2013 D

Tennis Wall Calendar 2013 ATennis Wall Calendar 2013 BTennis Wall Calendar 2013 C

 


Tennis AnatomyTennis Anatomy – E. Paul Roetert & Mark S. Kovacs

Tennis Anatomy Book. Focusing on the exercises and tecniques you need to improve your strength, speed and agility, this book will provide an education like no other. Learn how to modify exercises to target specific areas, improve your skills, and minimize injury. Every tennis player has specific needs and Tennis Anatomy allows you to understand and implement training on both an informative and practical level.

“In Tennis Anatomy, the authors do a terrific job of explaining how to use a balanced strength and conditioning program. Theinformation is practical for all levels and an invaluable tool for better performance on court.” – Paul Annacone (Current coach of Roger Federer and Former Coach of Pete Sampras)

“Tennis Anatomy is an essential resource for both players and coaches. Roetert and Kovacs provide expert instruction and a one-of-a-kind look inside the game.” John Isner (United States Davis Cup Player)

– 72 effective exercises with step-by-step descriptions and full-color anatomical illustrations highlighting muscles in action.
– Exercises for both baseline and net
– Illustrations of active muscles for forehands, backhands volleys, overheads and serves, showing how each exercise you do is fundamentally linked to your tennis performance


Roger Federer - The GreatestRoger Federer: The Greatest – by Chris Bowers

“For several years, tennis aficionados wondered whether they could really call Roger Federer the greatest ever tennis player. In 2009, Federer ended that debate by completing his collection of career Grand Slams and overtaking Pete Sampras’ all-time record of 14 major titles. With his olympic gold medal from 2008, Federer is now recognised as the greatest tennis player and has achieved legendary status in the wider sporting world. This authoritative and affectionate biography traces the rise of Federer, from his first tentative strokes with a tennis racket to how he dealt with being sent away to a training academy where he struggled to communicate in a French-speaking part of Switzerland; and how he handled the sudden death of his first real coach and mentor. It looks at his development as a sportsman and how he has matured into a family man with his marriage to Mirka Vavrinec and the birth of their twin girls. It also examines how Roger bounced back from arguably one of the most challenging periods of his career as, following a serious illness and a dip in form, his run of successive Wimbledon championship wins was ended and he was toppled from the number one spot by his long-time rival Rafael Nadal. In characteristic style, Federer silenced his criticsby winning the French Open title for the first time, reclaiming his Wimbledon crown and ending 2009 at the number one position for the fifth time.”–Publisher’s description.


The Greatest tennis Matches of All TimeThe Greatest Tennis Matches of All Time – by Steve Flink

Author and tennis historian Steve Flink profiles and ranks the greatest tennis matches in the history of the sport. Roger Federer, Billie Jean King, Rafael Nadal, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Martina Navratilova, Rod Laver, and Chris Evert are all featured in this book that breaks down, analyzes, and puts into historical context the most memorable matches ever played. Practically providing readers with a courtside seat at tennis’ most historic and significant duels, this resource is sure to be the start—and end—of many tennis debates.


Roger Federer - Back on TopRoger Federer: Back on Top – by Richard Kent

Amazon Customer Reviews

Richard continues to provide his unique insight into the tennis world. His perspective and style make this an excellent read for not just the tennis fan but for anyone interested in what it takes to be at the top of your profession.

Another excellent book by Richard Kent, noted sports writer from Connecticut. Kent has once again captured the essence of profesional tennis. A must read for the serious tennis fan– this one even better than his inside look at the US Open.


Tennis Skills & DrillsTennis Skills & Drills – by Joey Rive

Solid groundstrokes, a confident net game, a dictating serve, a sharp return game, and specialty shots for every situation—build your game from the ground up with the techniques and shots that are essential for success in today’s versatile and powerful game. Combine that with winning tactics for singles and doubles, and Tennis Skills & Drills is your blueprint for taking your game to the next level.

Start with assessing the basic techniques for the various strokes and see how you can improve your footwork, grip choices, and swing patterns. Then increase your options with spins, angles, and depth. Complete instruction for all of the strokes along with over 110 practice drills is like having your own personal coach.


 

Get Your Kids Active – Give the Gift of Tennis!

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and tennis is a great way to get your kids active! From September 1 through October 6, there are lots of events happening near you. Best of all, these events are for all ages and skill levels. For beginners, a USTA Free Tennis Play Day can serve as a great event to sample tennis with the extra excitement and benefit of the USTA’s association with Nickelodeon! Kids will have the opportunity to play tennis as well as participate in a variety of tennis skills activities. Play Days are designed to give kids additional court time in a fun, low-pressure, non-elimination setting where they can continue to develop and enhance their skills.

Click ‘Find an Event’ to the right and get started. Get your kids active!

Is the End in Sight for Men’s College Tennis?


No, this is not an article about the new NCAA Rules.  I may do one in the near future, as that is a hot topic.  Unfortunately,almost all of the conversation has been one sided and I won’t do anything until people who like the new rules at least get a chance to air their views too.  This article is about the loss of so many men’s college tennis programs.

On November 15th, the University of Maryland announced that it was cutting several sports, among them was Men’s Tennis.  We are talking about an ACC team here, one of the premier college sports leagues in the country, dropping it’s Men’s Tennis program.  The ACC has recently signed a deal with ESPN which pays each of it’s schools 17 million dollars a year so it’s hard to imagine there isn’t any money there for tennis.  If a school that gets $17 million a year for TV rights can’t afford to keep Men’s Tennis going, how can we expect a school like Williams or Bates to keep Men’s Tennis (NOTE: I used these names randomly.  Neither program seems to be in any danger of being dropped).

Locally, we experienced the same thing more than 15 years ago when the University at Albany (then SUNY Albany) dropped it’s Men’s Tennis team.

Earlier this year the College of Idaho dropped it’s Men’s Tennis program as did Jacksonville University.

University of California at Riverside is considering dropping it’s Men’s Tennis program in favor of Women’s Sand Volleyball.  They decided, at the end of May, to keep the program for another year while they decide it’s ultimate fate.

On July 21, 2011 East Stroudsburg sent out the following press release:

ESU dropping men’s tennis

July 21, 2011|By Nick Fierro, Of The Morning Call

East Stroudsburg University has dropped varsity men’s tennis beginning immediately, the school announced Thursday.

One of the university’s longest-standing sports, the program debuted in 1929-30 and claimed a share of 10 Pennsylvania Conference championships from 1961 through 1977. The program won 425 matches over 78 seasons and had a winning percentage of .466.

The news is not just bad news.  There were four new Men’s Tennis programs established this year: Arizona Christian University, Ottawa University, Southern Utah University and University of North Dakoda

If you are interested in preserving Men’s College tennis there is something you can do to help.  The Intercollegiate Tennis Association is setting up an Advocacy Network for college tennis.  You can sign up to be part of the efforts by filling out and submitting the form – CLICK HERE

Eastern Juniors Receive USTA Serves College Scholarships


USTA Eastern Section Logo

USTA Serves, the National Charitable Foundation of the United States Tennis Association (USTA), is granting 59 high school students a variety of college scholarships, totaling more than $410,000.

An objective of USTA Serves is to encourage children to pursue their goals and highest dreams by succeeding in school and becoming responsible citizens. Each year, USTA Serves awards scholarships to deserving youth who have participated in USTA and other organized youth tennis programs, have demonstrated high academic achievement, and require financial assistance for college matriculation.

“It is with great pleasure that USTA Serves is awarding more than $410,000 in scholarships to assist such exemplary students as they prepare to embark on their college journey,” said Deborah Slaner Larkin, Executive Director, USTA Serves. “These young men and women have not only excelled on the tennis court, but have served as role models for others in their schools and communities. It is our hope that as they enter the next chapter of their lives, that they continue to aspire to greatness for themselves and for the betterment of society.”

For a complete listing of the Scholarships and their winners – CLICK HERE

High School Tennis Results – May 17


CLASS A Sectional Semi Finals


Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Spartans: 6  def.  Gloversville Dragon Huskies: 1

Nate Ligon(G) def. Nate Wolf 6-7(5), 6-3, 6-0
Matt Bunch (BH) def. Andrew Beckham 6-0, 6-0
Ethan Baker (BH) def. Kyle Gargulio 6-2, 6-4
Max Batty (BH) def. Matt Blanchard 6-1, 6-0
Shane Crowley (BH) def. Scott Bruce 6-0, 6-2
Brad Hjelmar/Vincent Fulgieri (BH) def. Mike Marotta/Jordan Coughlin 6-0, 6-4
Nolan Hale/Geoff Putman (BH) def. Ryan Flint/Sheldon Billa 6-0, 6-0


Scotia-Glenville Tartans  4  def.  Albany Academy Cadets 3

Singles
Rob Schmitz (SG) def Stefan Kuhar 6-3, 6-3
Peter Campito (AA) def Christian LeVielle 6-1, 6-3
Josh Motta (SG) def Peter Lobel 6-4, 6-0
Matt Benton (AA) def Matt Ashcroft 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-1
Jake Miorin (AA) def Josh Culora 7-5, 6-1

Doubles
Seamus Sweeney/ Ryan Carroll (SG) def Alex Silver/James Xu Li 6-1, 6-2
Adam Ashcroft/Aaron Keegan (SG) def Nick Abel/Kevin Butler 6-1, 4-6, 6-2

Match Notes
The match was played at Scotia-Glenville High School
With the overall team score at 3 to 3, Scotia’s  2nd doubles team pulled out the deciding match
Finals will be played next Week
SG will be making their13th  STRAIGHT Sectional Final Appearance-
SG has won 8 Sectional Championships in the last 12 years


Class AA Sectional Quarterfinals Tennis Scores

Bethlehem Eagles  8   def.   Shenendehowa Plainsmen 1

SINGLES
Rohin Bose (B) def. Tom Flaim 6-3, 6-1
Nick DeLuke (B) def. Logan Suouitan 6-1, 6-2
Nick Mashuta (B) def. Ishan Parashar 6-1, 6-1
Jimmy Ding (B) def. Sanjay Achar 6-4, 6-4
Jay Gu (B) def. Caleb Dorn 6-3, 6-4
Ben Sanders (B) def. Ritwik Kishra 6-0, 6-3

DOUBLES
Ronald Shi/Nick Warren (B) def. Eric Pittz/Jacob Esposito 6-7, 6-3, 7-6
Connor McMahon/Josh Dubey (B) def. Jack Loughran/Joshua Bay 6-1, 6-2
Mark Brenner/Joe Raspante (S) def. Artem Timofeev/Sam Heller 7-6, 4-6, 7-6

Bethlehem improved to 13-0 on the season and will face Saratoga in the Sectional semi-finals at 8:30am in Schenectady’s Central Park.  Guilderland will face Ballston Spa in the other semi-final match.  The winners will meet in the finals tomorrow afternoon at 1:00.


USTA Leagues – New Age Divisions for 2013


USTA League is changing its structure and format for the 2013 National Championships, which affects many League seasons in 2012. Gone are the monikers “Senior” (50 & over) and “Super Senior” (60 & over), replaced instead by a more representative grouping based on age.

USTA Leagues

Under the new structure, the USTA League National Championships will fall under just two divisions—Adult and Mixed. The Adult Division will be broken down into 18 & over, 40 & over, and 55 & over with a potential 65 or 70 & over league type considered for the future. Sections are encouraged to add a 65 or 70& over league type locally. The Mixed Division will be 18 & over, which is the same as the previous format, with the potential to add a 40 & over league type in the future. As they had previously, players will continue to compete by NTRP rating within each division.

The New / The Old

The New starting age group is called Adult 18 & Over. / The Old starting age group was called Adult.  Both groups start at age 18.   The New middle age group is called Adult 40 & Over. / The Old middle age group was called Seniors and started at age 55.  The Newest age group will be called Adult 55 & Over.  /  The old Super Seniors were age 60 and Over.

But Why?

According to the USTA “The decision to change the structure was made to better distribute USTA League participants among the three age categories…  Existing data research, player surveys and player focus groups clearly indicated a need for age restructuring in order to provide more competitive match play.”

What will take tennis to the next level?


LeBron James

LeBron James (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Current conversation going on at reddit.com

The most recent Australian Open final showed that tennis has reached new heights and I was wondering where can it go from this? What are your thoughts?

I believe that when someone like Lebron James or Michael Vick pick up a tennis racket is when the really crazy tennis is going to happen.

CLICK HERE to view the conversation and/or join in. (51 posts and counting)

Janko Tipsarevic Interview


A Great interview with Janko Tipsarevic from the Pune Mirror (India)

* * * * * * * *

In a candid interview world No. 9 Janko Tipsarevic talks about growing up in war-torn Serbia, his limitations and his views on Indian tennis

Mikhil Bhat

Posted On Saturday, January 07, 2012 at 09:02:53 AM

Chennai: Janko Tipsarevic is nothing like most players on the Tour. He reads philosophy, which, with all due respect to athletes, is pretty rare. German philosophers Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche, and Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky form his reading list. They also find a place in ink on his body. But let’s skip that. The ATP rep says he doesn’t like talking about that.

Point noted.

Growing up in war-torn Yugoslavia, perhaps? “I don’t think I am going to give you a sad story about my family not having any money and being poor,” the world number nine says. Hmmm… next question. “By the way, all of that is true.”

Tipsarevic was one of the first players to come up after a drought of athletes, among other things, that hit the country in the last decade of the 20th century. “Tennis, when I was growing up in Serbia was completely dead. You know, war, bad politicians,” he says. The last known tennis player from the country was Slobodan Zivojinovic, who now also heads the Serbian tennis federation.

“There was no one to guide me, to tell me what should I do, except for my father, who was a physical education professor in high school,” he talks of his father Pavel.

It was in a Belgrade swimming pool that Tipsarevic practiced his tennis, while a few, including Novak Djokovic, he says, moved to other countries to practice. “Novak went to, I think, Germany, Ana Ivanovic went to Switzerland, some went to America but I stayed back,” the 27-year-old says.

* * * * * * *

And by the way, he wears glasses while playing because those are prescription lenses and not sunglasses he wears for fun. One learns it the hard way. Another thing he doesn’t like being asked. The ATP rep was a little late to inform about that.

For the whole interview – CLICK HERE

Roomate prank


Found this thread on Reddit – This picture and the text associated with it started a conversation – Highlights below.

So I had a few thousand extra tennis balls laying around, thought maybe I would give them to my roommate. (i.imgur.com)

Pringles was originally a tennis ball company. FACT.

(editor’s note: This is not actually true but it was a one liner by the late comedian Mitch Hedberg – I think Pringles’ initial intention was to make tennis balls, but on the day that the rubber was supposed to show up, a big truckload of potatoes arrived. And Pringles is a laid-back company — they said, …… Cut ’em up.’)

ah! so thats the load pringles never got.

Pringles have roughly the equivalent nutritional value as a tennis ball. FACT.

If he has a dog, it’s going to be so excited

Us dog owners just walk our dogs around the tennis court and find them for free.

Dog Heaven

My dogs dream car

 

 

Spanish Men and Their Success


Rafael Nadal at 2009 Sony Ericsson Open, Miami...

Image via Wikipedia

Found this on the “Everything Tennis” Blog – it is an interesting article although I don’t particularly agree that Jack Sock is the “one American male player has a good chance to win a major in the next 5 years” (I see possibilities for Ryan Harrison and  Denis Kudla as possibilities)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

We don’t necessarily need to train like the Spanish. We need to be like the Spanish. The best attribute of the Spanish men-even more than their great athletes and grind harder mentality-is their team spirit in an individual sport. They genuinely rally around each other and help pull each other up. An example explains it all. Nadal was a brash, cocky and amazing young star on the rise 10 years ago. The Spanish players practiced with him, advised him, and brought him into their fold. If Nadal was American I think he would have been put through some very negative pressures by our players for his fist pumps, stare downs, pirate shorts, etc. Without the team support of his countrymen he certainly would not be the gracious, mature champion that he is today. Now we have a budding superstar in our fold. Will we treat him well and help him win majors and push our sport to greater heights, or we will we chastise and ridicule his young, cocky and brash habits and try to keep him from fully realizing his potential. In my opinion only one American male player has a good chance to win a major in the next 5 years and compete at the very top of men’s tennis: Jack Sock. How will he be nurtured by the American pros? This may define his ascension and longetivity in our great game.

CLICK HERE for the Everything Tennis Blog

Skidmore Women’s tennis nabs three weekly awards


Saratoga Springs, N.Y. – On Monday, the Liberty League announced that three members of the Skidmore College women’s tennis team were recognized for their performance during the past week.

In women’s tennis, Nataly Mendoza and Lee Ford were named Co-Performers of the Week, while Alex Smith was named Rookie of the Week.

Mendoza and Ford finished fourth at the USTA/ITA Small College Doubles Championships after posting a first round upset over second seed Claremont-Mudd-Scripps.  The pair fell in the next round to eventual champion Emory.

Smith won a NY State Championship at both number five singles and number two doubles.  She posted a 3-0 record in singles and teamed withRobyn Baird to go 3-0 in the doubles draw.

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